Campaign funding times two

These two interactive visualizations has been in the drawer all summer. I made them in June already and did a small effort to get them published, but then I when that didn’t happen they were sort of forgotten about.

The starting point was the campaign funding data that was published after the parliamentary elections here in Finland. All MPs have to publicly declare all donations above 1500 euros. The data can be found here, or in a slightly refined form here (thanks Helsingin Sanomat!). Helsingin Sanomat has already provided their own visualization, check it out here.

The network

I started by approaching the data as a network using Protovis. This was the result:

Click to open in new window. Note that it takes a while to load.

I think the output is not too shabby, although the loading time here is really not acceptable. I couldn’t find a way to fasten up the rendering. The JavaScript code could also have been better, but I learned a lot in the process of putting it all together and would have been able to write a much smoother code today I think.

The explorer

The network approach above might be pretty, but not as informative as it could be. Again I used Protovis to build an interface that quickly lets you browse through all the reports.

Click to open in new window. The explorer itself is in Finnish.

I think this visualization has a lot of strengths. It is “click-less” which means you can quickly browse the candidates. Life is too short to be clicking. The loading time is also much, much shorter than in the network visualization.

Any thoughts?

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Eurovision Song Contest voting data mapped

It is time for the European championship of neighbour voting again, that is the Eurovision Song Contest. I came across a great dataset last weekend with all the entries since 1998 including voting data. I wrote a Ruby script that reshaped the list of entries into nodes and links, which made it possible to construct a network analysis. With a bit of Excel magic I managed to put together an interactive Protovis visualization (opens in new window):

Click to open the interactive visualization.

A few things to note:

  • Displayed here are the links between countries that, in average, give each other the highest points.
  • I have filtered links with a count of two or less. In other words: a country must have gotten points from another country at least three times to get a link. That means you won’t find a country like Cyprus in the network.
  • You need an updated browser to view the visualization.

Want to build your own visualization?


The opinions of our new parliament – in 30 seconds

Yesterdays elections turned out to be even more exciting than everyone had expected. True Finns shocked everyone with their third position. Trying to get a government together now is not easy.

But what opinions do the new Finnish parliament represent? I’ve put together an interactive tool that lets you explore the opinions of the new MP’s – in about 30 seconds. It is based on the answers given in Yle’s vaalikone. I had to put it on a different server because this WordPress blog doesn’t support own Javascript adventures. Open it here.

Application opens in new window. Requires an updated web browser.

This was my first real visualization in the Javascript based Protovis. I strongly recommend it so far. I hardly have any prior Javascript experience, but with assistance from the tutorials at Knight Digital Media Center I have been able to figure it out quite quickly. I especially appreciate the possibilities to create interactivity. Made me realized what a waste of time mouse-clicking is (compared to mouseover interaction).

  • Get the data. (Note that the answers might be slightly outdated, I noted in the reporting from Yle that a few new candidates seem to have participated since I did the scrape. However, the big picture should be accurate.)