Tutorial: Choropleth map in CartoDB using QGIS

The 2.0 version of the Fusion Tables challenger CartoDB was released last week. This is great news for all those of you that, for one reason or another, want to break free of Google Maps. CartoDB lets you geocode and plot addresses and other geographical points on Open Street Map tiles,  just like Fusion Tables does in Google Maps. With a little help from Quantum GIS you will also be able to make beautiful choropleth maps.

In this tutorial I will walk you through this process. It will hopefully be a good intro to QGIS and geospatial data if you are new to these concepts.

Step 1: Getting the geo data

I’m going to map unemployment data in Swedish muncipalities. So I obviously need a municipality map of Sweden.

Maps come in different formats. For this purpose a basic vector map (in svg format for example) is not robust enough. We need a .shp-, .geojson- or .kml-file. The difference between those formats and svg is that they define data points in geographical coordinates, whereas the svg is defined in pixels. Fortunately the Statistics Bureu of Sweden is generous enough to provide shape-maps of the municipalities.

SCB

Now go to QGIS (I think you need to be at version 1.7 to be able to follow this tutorial) and import the downloaded map (Layer >Add vector layer or Ctrl+Shift+V). Sweden_municipality07.shp is the file you want to select. Set the encoding to ISO-8859-1 to get all the Swedish charachters right.

import

imported

Step 2: Appending data

I got some basic unemployment data from SCB and changed the municipality names to official ids. Here is the whole set.

To join the unemployment data with the map we need to have a column that we can use as a key. A way to patch the two datasets together. In QGIS, right-click the map layer and choose Open Attribute Table to see the embedded metadata.

attribute table

As you kan see the map contains both names and ids for all the municipalities. We’ll use these ids as our key.

Go back to your Google spreadsheet and save it dataset as a csv-file (File > Download as) and import it in QGIS (again: Layer >Add vector layer or Ctrl+Shift+V).

import_csv

You will now see a new layer in the left-hand panel.

panel

Confirm that the data looks okay my right-clicking the unemployment layer and selecting attribute table.

attribute table2

To join the two datasets right-click the map layer and choose Properties. Open the tab Joins.

join

Make sure that you select kommunid and KNKOD (the key columns). To make sure that the merge was successful open the attribute table of the map layer.

join completeAs you can see a column with the unemployment data has now been added.The map now contains all the information we need and we are ready to export it. Select the map layer and click Layer > Save as.

export

Two important things to note here. Choose GeoJSON as your format and make sure you set the coordinate system to WGS 84. That is the global standard used on Open Street Map and Google Maps. On this map the coordinates are defined in the Swedish RT90 format, which you can see in the statusbar if you hover the map.

coordinates

Step 3: Making the actual map

Congratulations you’ve now completed all the difficult parts. From here on it’s a walk in the park.

Go to CartoDB, login and click Create new table. Now upload your newly created GeoJSON file.

CartoDB import

You can double-click the GeoJSON cells to see the embedded coordinates.

Skärmavbild 2012-12-14 kl. 18.34.01

Move all the way to the right of the spreadsheet and locate the unemployment column. If it has been coded as a string you have to change it to number.

number

If you go to the Map view tab your map should now look something like this:

map1

To colorize the map click the Style icon in the right-side panel, choose choropleth map and set unemployment as your variable. And, easy as that, we have a map showing the unemployment in Sweden:

final map

Click to open map in new window.

Concluding remarks

I have played around with CartoDB for a couple of days now and really come to like it. It still feels a little buggy and small flaws quickly start to bug you (for exemple the lack of possibilities to customize the infowindows). And the biggest downside of CartoDB is obviously that it is not free of charge (after the first five maps). But apart from that it feels like a worthy competitor to Google Fusion Tables. Once you get a hold of the interface you can go from idea to map in literally a few minutes.


One Comment on “Tutorial: Choropleth map in CartoDB using QGIS”

  1. […] Tutorial: Choropleth map in CartoDB using QGIS → […]


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